How Much Does A Printer Cost

Whether you already own a printer and you’re looking for an upgrade, or you’ve never owned one and want to arm yourself with a printing contraption, so to speak, buying a printer before you know how much does a printer cost.

The thing is, purchasing a printer nowadays is as easy as opening a couple of tabs in your web browser, visiting some online stores where you can check out different printer models, and choosing the one that suits your needs the best.

Next, you just need to press the add to cart button and you’re good to go, right?

Well, not exactly.

In this article, we’re going to highlight some of the most important parameters to look into when buying a printer. Also, we’ll explain how much does a printer cost of different model and how the amount you pay will ‘hold out’ in terms of the longevity of the model you purchased.

Without further ado, here’s the deal.

Comparison Table of Best Printer

Preview
HP DeskJet 3755 Compact All-in-One Wireless Printer, HP Instant Ink, Works with Alexa - Stone Accent (J9V91A)
Epson EcoTank ET-4760 Wireless Color All-in-One Cartridge-Free Supertank Printer with Scanner, Copier, Fax, ADF and Ethernet - Black
Canon Pixma TS3320 Black, Works with Alexa
HP DeskJet 2755e Wireless Color All-in-One Printer with bonus 6 free months Instant Ink with HP+ (26K67A)
Title
HP DeskJet 3755 All-in-One Wireless Printer
Epson EcoTank ET-4760 Supertank Printer
Canon Pixma TS3320 Printer
HP DeskJet 2755e Wireless Printer
Print Speed (Max)
19 ppm
15 ppm
7.7 ppm
7.5 ppm
Item Weight
5.13 pounds
19.16 pounds
1 pounds
7.55 pounds
Rating
-
-
-
-
Prime
-
Preview
HP DeskJet 3755 Compact All-in-One Wireless Printer, HP Instant Ink, Works with Alexa - Stone Accent (J9V91A)
Title
HP DeskJet 3755 All-in-One Wireless Printer
Print Speed (Max)
19 ppm
Item Weight
5.13 pounds
Rating
-
Prime
Preview
Epson EcoTank ET-4760 Wireless Color All-in-One Cartridge-Free Supertank Printer with Scanner, Copier, Fax, ADF and Ethernet - Black
Title
Epson EcoTank ET-4760 Supertank Printer
Print Speed (Max)
15 ppm
Item Weight
19.16 pounds
Rating
-
Prime
Preview
Canon Pixma TS3320 Black, Works with Alexa
Title
Canon Pixma TS3320 Printer
Print Speed (Max)
7.7 ppm
Item Weight
1 pounds
Rating
-
Prime
-
Preview
HP DeskJet 2755e Wireless Color All-in-One Printer with bonus 6 free months Instant Ink with HP+ (26K67A)
Title
HP DeskJet 2755e Wireless Printer
Print Speed (Max)
7.5 ppm
Item Weight
7.55 pounds
Rating
-
Prime

How Much Does A Printer Cost

While you can get a brand-new printer delivered to your doorstep this way rather easily, the question is – how do you know you chose the right printer for your needs?

Also, how do you know you didn’t spend an arm and a leg on a printer that has a bunch of features that you don’t need.

This is the part where choosing your printer can get a tad tricky.

There are printer models nowadays on the market that have a multitude of different options and features that involve not only printing, but also scanning, Wi-Fi connectivity, and even faxing!

These types of printers are typically quite expensive, so how do you strike that fine balance between paying a reasonable price for a printer, while still getting all the features that you need for your job or your personal needs.

Initial Cost of Printers

Typically, most office printer models cost between $200 to $500, depending on the technology they’re using and the number of features they have on them.

That said, you can also find printer models that are cheaper than $200 or even models that are more expensive than $500. Again, it all depends on what features you want and the size of the cartridges you need. (Also, whether the printer is monochromatic or color printer plays an important role in how much it will cost, as we explained above.)

Calculating the cost of a printer in the long run

First, you need to figure out the cost-per-page number.

To do this, simply take the price of the cartridge and then divide it by the highest yield value. For example, a standard 2,300-page cartridge can cost around $80. That means that the price per page is $80 / 2,300 = 0.035 cents.

Then, multiply this number by the approximate number of pages the printer will be able to produce over its lifespan. Let’s say this number is around 30,000.

So, 30,000 x 0.035 = $1,050.

In the end, add the estimated price of paper (let’s say around $200) and the initial cost of the printer (let’s make it $350) and you get $1,050 + $200 +$350 = $1,600.

Now, how many years the printer will ‘live’ depends, of course, on how often you use it.

In the case above, if you print something like 5,000 pages every year, then the price above ($1,600) is the overall number representing the combined cost for the initial purchase and the operating costs over 6 years.

Types of Printers

how much does a printer cost

In the world of computer peripheries, printers are one of the categories that have the most versatility, so to speak. There are many different types of printers and listing them all would require a completely new, in-depth article.

For this article, we’ll highlight the three most commonly found types of printers and what makes each of them so popular.

Inkjet Printers

As their name suggests, inkjet printers use special ink cartridges to print the text and images you want.

The trick with these types of printers is that their starting price is typically the lowest of all types of printers. (Especially when compared to laser printers and multifunctional ones.)

That said, while this starting price is pretty low, the operating costs of an inkjet printer are usually the highest of all printers, which makes them fairly expensive in the long run.

Of course, the important thing to remember is to ask yourself what purpose you need a printer for?

If you don’t use printers often, then an inkjet can be a solid purchase. They give you excellent image quality and they are relatively inexpensive if you use them rarely.

On the other hand, if you run a business and need to print a lot of pages regularly, these types of printers would probably be the worst overall solution.

Laser Printers

In comparison to inkjet printers, laser printers are typically more expensive when you first buy them.

The fact that they use more advanced technology to function has something to do with this, of course.

When it comes to their toner costs, however, they’re usually less expensive than their inkjet counterparts, which makes laser printers less expensive to operate in the long run.

So, if you plan to use your printer regularly, purchasing a laser printer instead of an inkjet one can be a great idea. Add to that the fact that laser printers are more durable, print faster, offer a higher page yield per cartridge and have overall better warranties, and you can see that laser printers are clear winners for the folks who need to print pages regularly.

Multifunctional Printers

Multifunctional Printers represent the most expensive type of printer out of the three.

The reason why they are more expensive is that, as their name suggests, these printers offer you several additional features other than printing. As we hinted at in the introduction to this article, these printers can also be used to scan documents, copy documents, as well as fax. (Depending on the model, these features may vary, of course.)

Multifunctional printers can be a great option for people who don’t want to buy scanners, copiers, and fax machines separately – which is certainly the more expensive option.

The slight downside to these multipurpose printers is that if one thing breaks, usually this means that you won’t be able to use other components, either. (This is because they are all connected to the same microprocessor.)

Color vs. Monochromatic Printers

In case you need printers to print out a bunch of text documents, using a monochromatic printer can be a great option.

Since monochromatic printers only use one color cartridge (black), you don’t have to worry about running out of cyan and then having to replace the thing earlier than the other colored toners. (Which often happens with color printers.)

Also, black ink is typically considerably less expensive than color cartridges and it usually lasts longer.

As far as color printers are in question, the key is to ask yourself if you need one in the first place.

While printing colored documents is certainly a more appealing prospect than having the option of only black to work with, if you’re only printing text documents, you may be better off just buying a monochromatic printer.

On the other hand, if you want to be able to print beautiful, colorful images, having a color printer is pretty much the only way to do it.

Another important thing – the starting cost of a monochromatic printer is also considerably lower than that of a color printer, so that would be another factor in favor of monochromatic models. (At least if printing economy and cartridge costs are a factor for you.)

Types of Cartridges

how much does a printer cost

Standard Yield

When it comes to how many pages a printer can print before it runs out of ink or toner, it’s important to remember what your needs are in terms of how often and how much you print.

If you print rarely and only for certain projects a couple of times a week, then getting a printer with a standard yield may be enough for you.

These printers have cartridges that will able to produce about 2,300 pages, so if this is enough for you, it may be a good idea to buy these ‘standard yield’ models, so that you can save some money by not buying unnecessarily large cartridges. (Which tend to be fairly expensive.)

High Yield

Printers represent a special breed of printers, or more precisely – printer cartridges, that you can use to print as many as 6,500 pages per cartridge.

Of course, this larger toner also means that the starting cost of the printer will be higher, so you should only consider buying a printer with this type of yield if you print often and you want to cut the costs of toner in the long run.

Jumbo Yield

Printers that have the so-called jumbo yield will give you up to 9,500 pages per single cartridge, which is more than the first two page-yield categories combined.

This type of printer is also the most expensive of the three.

Typically, people who own businesses that need a lot of printing done on a day-to-day basis buy printers with the so-called jumbo yield, so if you don’t need to print that often, this option may not be the best for you.

Conclusion

Buying a printer is usually a pretty good idea if you need to print documents regularly. As you can see, spending about a thousand and five hundred bucks on a printer for six years is not that much, especially if you take into consideration the convenience of being able to print at home or office whenever you like.

We hope you found how much does a printer cost in this article helpful and wish you plenty of success with your printing tasks.

About Tom

Tom is a blogger and artist who also loves technology. He spends his days blogging about the latest developments in the world of art, and he enjoys sharing his thoughts with readers on what it means to be an artist today. Tom has always been interested in technology - but it wasn't until he was 13 years old that he discovered how much fun making websites could be! Tom is a fun-loving, adventure seeking creative type. He enjoys reviewing art products and technology gadgets on his blog and has been doing so for over 5 years now! He spends most of his time in the studio, at the beach, or out exploring new places.

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